Tri-City Mental Health Center is committed to helping consumers and their families by providing a comprehensive array of mental health services and special programs, ranging from prevention and early intervention to recovery.  When difficulties arise, highly trained professionals are on staff and ready to assist.


Gary Slaton
(909)784-3045
gslaton@tricitymhs.org

 

Tri-City’s experienced and highly trained multidisciplinary outpatient staff provides a broad array of services designed to increase functioning and improve the quality of life for each client served.  Individualized treatment plans are designed to identify each client’s specific needs, including multiple diagnoses and/or co-occurring substance abuse issues.  Treatment modalities include intensive psychiatric assessment (and subsequent office-based medication support at clinic sites), individual and group/family therapy, and case management services.


Deborah Johnson, LMFT
Child/Family Services Program Manager
(909) 766-7307
djohnson@tricitymhs.org

 

The goal of Tri-City Mental Health Center’s Children Outpatient clinic is to strengthen the parent/caregiver-child relationship, support the family’s capacity to care for their children, and to enhance the child’s social and emotional functioning and development.  Many of today’s children and teenagers are faced with a great deal of stress in their home and/or school environments, and as a result may be struggling with anxiety, depression, or other emotional distress.  Still others may be experiencing serious mood or thought disorders and could greatly benefit from early intervention and treatment.  Available services include individual and group/family therapy, case management services, and office-based medication support (at clinic sites).


Community Navigator Program
Isela Moreno, MHSA Program Supervisor
(888) 436-3246
imoreno@tricitymhs.org


Tri-City’s Community Navigator Program consists of highly trained individuals who specialize in linkage and referral to local resources.  This mission critical program has been structured for the purpose of helping people gain access to the services and support they need, both formal and informal.  Community navigators regularly visit the following settings (among others):

  • Community organizations
  • Emerging and well established health and mental health programs
  • Law enforcement agencies
  • Schools
  • Courts
  • Residential facilities
  • Local NAMI chapter
  • Self-help groups
  • Client advocacy groups

This model provides the preliminary infrastructure necessary to implement a localized system of care which is responsive to the individual needs of communities, the people who receive services, and their families.


Gary Slaton, LMFT
(909)784-3045
gslaton@tricitymhs.org

 

This program is exclusively for persons 60 years of age or older who are experiencing mental health or other age-related problems, excluding dementia.  Older adults are the fastest growing populations in the Tri-City area, and while a number of programs provide them with health and social supports, there are few services available to meet the mental health needs of this population.  Older adults, especially those who are frail, need more accessible mental health services provided at locations convenient to them (i.e., in their homes, in senior centers, and in medical facilities).   Available services include but are not limited to the following:

  • A complete bio-psycho-social assessment
  • Therapeutic individual and group counseling for older adults and their families
  • Psychiatric and medication follow up
  • Case management
  • Referrals and assistance for a variety of local community and social services

Field Capable Clinical Services Referral form for 60+


Elizabeth Owens
Director of Clinical Program Services
(909) 784-3022
eowens@tricitymhs.org

 

Full Service Partnership is a mental health service program that provides comprehensive mental health services for individuals and families experiencing significant emotional and psychological problems that would benefit from intensive field-based services.  Treatment is available to children (0-15), transitional-aged youth (16-25), adults (26-59), and Older Adults (>60 years).  Clients requiring this level of service are generally seen 2-4 times per week in the community (i.e., at their home, school site).  Examples of services made available under this program are as follow:

  • Individual/family counseling and psychotherapy
  • Assistance reaching out to and securing community resources
  • Transportation assistance (i.e., assistance getting to appointments)
  • Obtaining necessary medication
  • Help with accessing physical health care for children and family members
  • Assistance with housing services to help locate suitable lodging for clients and family
  • Assistance getting the financial and health benefits to which clients are entitled
  • Treatment for harmful addictions (e.g., alcoholism, drugs, and misuse of prescription medications)
  • Help identifying and accessing educational opportunities
  • Help finding employment, vocational training, and/or volunteer opportunities

“Housing is Mental Wellbeing” Gilbert Saldate, TCMHS Public Outreach and Housing Manager

Tri-City Mental Health Services (TCMHS) understands that a lack of supportive housing can be a significant barrier to mental wellbeing and recovery for individuals suffering with mental illness and their families. The Substance Use and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) identifies housing, along with health, purpose and community, as one of the four major dimensions that support a life in recovery. Similarly, California’s Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act (MHSA), included funds for the development of permanent supportive housing in recognition that mental health services alone are often not enough to provide persons challenged by living with a serious and persistent mental illness long-term stability and wellbeing.

In 2008, TCMHS received $2.4 million as its housing allocation from MHSA to develop permanent supportive housing for the clients and families it serves. This allocation from the State was based on the population served by Tri-City and would have funded approximately 20-24 units in total.

Fortunately, as a result of the community stakeholder process mandated by Proposition 63, residents and interested parties from all three Tri-City area cities (Pomona, Claremont and La Verne), had the foresight to anticipate a much greater need for Tri-City consumers. In fiscal years 2008-09 and 2009-10, Tri-City Stakeholders requested that the TCMHS Governing Board approve to allocate additional unspent MHSA funds toward the development of permanent supportive housing. An additional $4.5 million was assigned and a total of $6.9 million has, to date, created 64 units of permanent supportive housing for those challenged by living with severe and persistent mental illness and their families in the Tri-City service area. Furthermore, the Tri-City housing funds have been used to leverage another 83 units of general affordable housing to support qualified individuals in this area. In addition to MHSA housing dollars, TCMHS has developed strong partnerships with the Housing Authorities of Pomona and the County of Los Angeles to access the Shelter Plus Care program, as well as a local property owner to establish a long-term master lease agreement. These Tri-City partnerships provide permanent supportive housing assistance to an additional 41 households and assist Tri-City clients and their families to access and maintain safe, stable and affordable housing.

On-going, through initiatives such as No Place Like Home and the annual MHSA stakeholder process, Tri-City will be able to continue its commitment to support the recovery and lasting wellbeing of its consumers and its families with the creation and/or development of permanent supportive housing options in the cities of Pomona, Claremont and La Verne.

For more information regarding MHSA Housing please contact:
Gilbert Saldate
Public Outreach and Housing Manager
(909) 326-4620
gsaldate@tricitymhs.org

For more information regarding how to get involved as a Stakeholder for Tri-City please contact:
Dana Barford
MHSA Projects Manager
(909) 326-4641
dbarford@tricitymhs.org

These housing options are available for clients currently receiving mental health services through Tri-City Mental Health Authority. However, enrollment for services is not a guarantee of housing. If you are not currently enrolled for mental health services with TCMHA, but would like housing assistance, please contact our Community Navigators at 888.436.3246.


Building on the success various peer counselling models including from the Center for Healthy Aging in Santa Monica, California, and the University of Washington, the Peer Mentor Program is available to persons of all ages within the Tri-City service area.  Volunteer mentors receive specialized training and on-going weekly supervision and support from TCMHC clinical staff members.  These volunteers meet individually with mentees and/or in groups to provide support.  Groups focus on providing support and creating opportunities for members to engage in projects that serve their communities and other wellness activities.

Potential recipients of these peer mentor services are referred in any number of ways, including through Tri-City Staff, area schools and colleges, faith-based organizations, and other community agencies or organizations.

To request Peer Mentor Services, please click here.

If you are interested in becoming a peer mentor, please click here.

For more information about Peer Mentor Program contact Jennifer Phang: jphang@tricitymhs.org

Peer Mentor Flyer

Brochure - English

Brochure - Español


Lisa Naranjo
MHSA Prevention and Early Intervention (PEI) Programs Coordinator
(909) 326-4632
LNaranjo@tricitymhs.org

 

The Prevention and Early Intervention Plan is principally organized around three projects: The Community Capacity-Building Project, the Family Wellbeing and Peer Support Project, and the Student Wellbeing Project.

PEI Project 01 - Community Capacity Building:This project includes two programs; the Community Wellbeing program and the Community Mental Health Trainers program.

Community Wellbeing Program

Tri-City Mental Health recognizes that prevention of mental and emotional distress can be as vital as treating those who are already suffering. We would like to support and partner with the communities and groups in the cities of Pomona, La Verne, and Claremont that are doing the vital work of maintaining or improving the wellbeing of their members.

The Community Wellbeing Program is part of the Tri-City Prevention and Early Intervention Plan, a plan developed by stakeholders across the three cities and funded through the Mental Health Services Act. If selected, your community will receive numerous forms of support including:

  • A grant of up to $10,000 to fund projects that enhance the wellbeing of your members
  • Greater awareness of mental health and wellbeing within your community
  • The opportunity to network and share with other communities in the area
  • Support and skill development in leadership, data analysis, and more
  • Connection to resources that might be useful for helping your members or accomplishing your mission

For more program information email canzalone@tricitymhs.org or call (909) 326-4635.


Community Mental Health Trainers Program

Community Mental Health Trainers train people throughout the Tri-City region in various strategies and practices to intervene quickly and effectively to offer support to persons experiencing mental and emotional distress Program trains scores of people in community-based settings to intervene quickly and effectively to offer support when someone is experiencing mental and emotional distress. This evidence-based program begins with the premise that just as people who are not doctors can master basic first aid for physical injuries (e.g., the Heimlich maneuver or CPR); people can also master basic mental health first aid without being clinicians.

In 2011, an initial group of 50 people successfully completed a five-day course to become certified MHFA instructors. Each of these 50 individuals is certified to offer a 12-hour MHFA course to members of the Tri-City area. The 12-hour MHFA course imparts knowledge and skills to people in an effort to assist them in learning how to help someone struggling with mental or emotional distress. Once trained, First Aiders are able to:

  • Identify the potential risk factors and warning signs for a range of mental health problems, including depression, anxiety, trauma, eating disorders, substance use disorders, self-injury, psychosis, and psychotic disorders
  • Develop an understanding of the prevalence of various mental health disorders in the U.S. and the need for reduced stigma in their communities
  • Implement a five-step action plan encompassing the skills, resources, and knowledge to assess the situation, and to help the individual in crisis connect with appropriate supports
  • Identify self-help, social, peer, and professional resources available to help someone with a mental health problem

For more information on Mental Health First Aid send email to cmht@tricitymhs.org or call 909-326-4680.

PEI Project 02 - Peer Support and Family Wellbeing:The Peer Support and Family Wellbeing Project offers a range of tailored structures of support and programming for older adults, older transition-aged youth/young adults, and for families of children and young transition-aged youth. The project includes two programs: The Peer Support Program, and the Family Wellbeing Program.

Family Wellbeing Program
The Family Wellbeing Program is located at the Wellness Center, and identifies existing community resources (e.g., the NAMI Parents and Teachers as Allies program, parent support groups), as well as developing new programming to support families of children and young transition-aged youth struggling with mental and emotional distress. As with the Peer Support program, potential recipients of these supports are identified by, among others:

  • Mental Health First Aiders trained under the Mental Health First Aid Program, located in non-traditional mental health settings across the three cities
  • Community leaders from unserved and under-served communities (e.g., Native American, Vietnamese, Latino, and other Asian and Pacific Islander communities) who are participating in the Community Wellbeing Program (also under the Community Capacity-Building Project)
  • CSS Community Navigators

Programming reflects the culture and traditions of families who seek support, and as with the Peer Support Program, includes a range of wellness activities (e.g., exercise, music, cultural awareness activities, etc.).

PEI Project 06 - Therapeutic Community Gardening (TCG):

Horticulture therapy is the process of using plants, gardening, and the innate closeness humans feel towards nature as direct tools of intervention in programs of therapy and rehabilitation. Although horticulture therapy is regarded as a still emerging mental health treatment model, its usage and practice in early forms can be traced as far back as the times of ancient Egypt. During weekly program groups and utilizing the practice of mindfulness, TCG clients are allowed the opportunity to plant, maintain, and harvest fruits, vegetables, flowers, and other crops for therapeutic purposes and symptom management. Through group gardening exercises as well as team discussions / activities, TCG clients also have the opportunity to engage with peers and develop positive social relationships with others in the community. Other program activities include cooking classes (centred on meal preparation with harvested crops), games, field trips, and horticulture workshops.

Please contact Sara Rodriguez or Elsa Rodriguez at (909) 623-6131 or tcg@tricitymhs.org for more information.


Ese Oniwor, LMFT
Supplemental Crisis Services Supervisor
(909) 784-3005
eoniwor@tricitymhs.org

 

Supplemental Crisis Services are after-hours clinical support available to any Tri-City resident who is not enrolled in formal treatment services.  The trained and experienced therapists who staff this crisis response line are available Monday through Thursday from 8:00 p.m. to 4:00 a.m., and during the weekend from 8:00 p.m. on Friday to 4:00 a.m. Sunday morning.  If you are experiencing significant emotional distress and need assistance during these hours, please call (909) 623-6131.

During Tri-City business hours, and on a walk-in basis only, Supplemental Crisis Services also provides crisis evaluation and intervention for persons in the Tri-City area who are not enrolled in formal treatment services. Staff that are trained and experienced  in crisis assessment and intervention are available to assist persons experiencing significant emotional distress at 2008 North Garey Avenue, Pomona, Mondays-Fridays from 8:30am-4:30pm.


Gibran Carter, MHSA Program Coordinator
(909) 326-4639
volunteer@tricitymhs.org

Volunteer at Tri-City

The volunteer program at Tri-City provides opportunities for individuals to get hands-on experience in public mental health. Volunteers support the staff in a wide variety of duties. These duties will vary depending on the department. The four programs that a person can volunteer with are:

  • The Wellness Center
  • Peer Mentor
  • Community Navigators
  • Therapeutic Community Gardening (TCG)

Please see the descriptions of each program below as well as the benefits and requirements to become a volunteer at Tri-City. If you are interested in volunteering please click here to fill out an application.

Benefits of becoming a volunteer

  • Hands-on experience
  • Job training skills
  • Preparation for workforce
  • Add to your resume
  • Personal Growth
  • Potential employment
  • Discount tickets to area attractions

Qualifying Requirements

  • Background check
  • Fingerprints
  • Drug screen
  • TB test
  • Must be 18 and over

Required Trainings(provided by Tri-City)

  • MHFA (Mental Health First Aid)
  • CPI (Crisis Prevention Intervention)

Volunteer Opportunities

Wellness Center

The Wellness Center is a hub of community activities that promote recovery, resiliency, and wellness for people confronting mental health issues. Staff located at this site, including peer advocates, family members, clinical staff, and others, provides a range of culturally competent, person – and family-centered groups, workshops and socialization activities designed to promote increasing independence and wellness for people of all ages. For more information about the Wellness Center click here.

Peer Counselor

The Peer Support Program is available to TAY (Transitional-Aged Youth) ages 16-25, adults ages 26-59 and seniors (60+ years) within the Tri-City service area. Volunteer counselors receive specialized training and on-going weekly supervision and support from TCMHC clinical staff members. These volunteers meet individually with counselees and/or in groups to provide support. Groups focus on providing support and creating opportunities for members to engage in projects that serve their communities and other wellness activities. For more information about the Peer Support Program click here.

Community Navigators

Tri-City’s Community Navigator Program consists of highly trained individuals who specialize in linkage and referral to local resources. This mission critical program has been structured for the purpose of helping people gain access to the services and support they need, both formal and informal. Community navigators regularly visit the following settings (among others):

  • Community organizations
  • Emerging and well established health and mental health programs
  • Law enforcement agencies
  • Schools
  • Courts
  • Residential facilities
  • Local NAMI chapter
  • Self-help groups
  • Client advocacy groups

For more information the Community Navigators click here.

Therapeutic Community Gardening (TCG):

Horticulture therapy is the process of using plants, gardening, and the innate closeness humans feel towards nature as direct tools of intervention in programs of therapy and rehabilitation. Although horticulture therapy is regarded as a still emerging mental health treatment model, its usage and practice in early forms can be traced as far back as the times of ancient Egypt. During weekly program groups, TCG clients are allowed the opportunity to plant, maintain, and harvest fruits, vegetables, flowers, and other crops for therapeutic purposes and symptom management. Through group gardening exercises as well as team discussions / activities, TCG clients also have the opportunity to engage with peers and develop positive social relationships with others in the community. Other program activities include cooking classes (centred on meal preparation with harvested crops), games, field trips, and horticulture workshops.

“At risk families” (parents / caregivers who are enduring emotional, bonding, or communication difficulties with their children)
Young adults (16 – 25)
Military veterans
Adults 26+

For more information on Therapeutic Community Gardening click here.

For more information on our volunteer process, please download our volunteer brochure click here.

Click here to fill out our volunteer application.


 

Gamaliel Polanco, LCSW
Wellness Center Manager
(909) 242-7600       
gpolanco@tricitymhs.org
 

The Tri-City mental health Wellness Center was created through funding from the Mental Health Services Act. The Wellness Center is a hub of community activities that promote recovery, resiliency, and wellness for people confronting mental health issues. Staff located at this site, including peer advocates, family members, clinical staff, and others, provides a range of culturally competent, person – and family-centered groups, workshops and socialization activities  designed to promote increasing independence and wellness for people of all ages.

For children, services include:

  • Mentoring
  • Skills building classes
  • Groups
  • Recreational activities
  • Art
  • Music
  • Leadership training


For young adults, services include:

  • Self-help groups
  • Peer support
  • Independent living skills coaching
  • Job and vocational training
  • Recreational activities
  • Specialized supports
  • Assessment and linkage
  • Leadership development


For adults, services include:

  • Assessment and linkage
  • Recreational and cultural activities
  • Educational resources
  • Services to promote independence (education, employment and housing)
  • Support networks

For the family, services include support to the individual member or members (as previously described) and to the family as a whole through parenting classes, resource development, budgeting and advocacy.

 

Wellness Center Calendar - Click Here

CalendariodeCentroWellness-Haga clic aquí

Transitional Age Youth Calendar - Click Here

 

Support Groups

Group activities/support groups at the Tri-City Wellness Center include the following:

Anxiety/Depression Groups:  These groups are open to individuals of any age who are experiencing anxiety and depression as part of their symptoms. It is both a support group as well as a learning group in which the facilitator provides instruction in the various coping skills used for the management of anxiety and depression.

Monthly Workshops:  Open to all consumers, presentations are made on different topics by a variety of community agencies.  Each month, a representative provides an overview of the benefits and enrollment process for the specific workshop being presented.  A question and answer period is built in to answer questions about specific cases (SSI, Emergency Preparedness, Skills Building, Money Management, Cooking, etc.).

Monthly Outings:  Recreational outings are planned to encourage and foster socialization and positive interactions between participants.  The outings are open to individuals of all ages, although children must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

TAY (Transitional Age Youth) Day-Socialization Support Group for Young Adults Ages 16-25: Different activities, such as board games, karaoke, video games, and social outings are made available to young adults.  The purpose of this group is for TAYs to interact with one another while improving their social skills and learning life functioning skills.

Dual Recovery Anonymous (DRA): This group is available to those who are presently dealing with or have previously experienced both mental health and substance abuse simultaneously.  It is open to individuals 18 years of age and over, and is facilitated in the Alcoholics Anonymous format.

Schizophrenia 101:  This support group is open to anyone 16 years of age and over who has been diagnosed as schizophrenic, has a family member suffering from schizophrenia, or simply wants more information related to this mental illness.  This group follows the guiding principles of Schizophrenics Anonymous.

Parenting Classes (Hosted by Pomona Unified School District):  Shirley Alvarez of Pomona Unified School District is the facilitator of a ten-week cycle course in which parents can earn a court mandated certificate. ($40 fee)

Parent Project:This group is designed to better equip those families struggling with the burdens of mental illness and psychosocial factors in their daily living.  This group runs on a sixteen-week cycle, and is open to parents and children five years of age and older.   A fee in the amount of $20 is charged for the workbook.

Arts Group:  Open to all individuals who take an active role in their recovery by creating and sharing their art work with others.  Attendees are welcome to bring their own art supplies, and are encouraged to provide creative guidance and/or mentoring to others.

Spanish Groups:  Various groups are facilitated in Spanish for monolingual consumers. They include (among others) a depression group, a socialization group called “Comadres y Compadres,” and a positive alternatives group. Anyone who is suffering from or wants to learn about depression or any other type of symptoms is encouraged to attend.

Walk for Fitness: This group is geared toward participants of all ages. Its purpose is to introduce physical activity into the overall emotional and mental wellbeing of individuals suffering from a mental illness.

Anger Management:  Open to individuals 18 years of age and over who are experiencing difficulties controlling and/or expressing their anger.  It is both a support group as well as a learning group in which the facilitator will teach about the different coping skills necessary in the effective management of anger.

Bipolar Group:  Open to individuals 18 and over who are experiencing symptoms of bipolar disorder. It is both a support group as well as a learning group in which the facilitator will provide instruction related to the different coping skills useful in the management of symptoms.

Socialization Group:  This socialization support group is available to adults aged 26-59.  A variety of activities, such as board games, karaoke, video games, and social outings are made available to adults.  The purpose of this group is for participants to interact with one another while improving their social skills and learning life functioning skills.

Music Group: Open to anyone who enjoys listening, learning, and playing music as a way to manage their mental health.  Individuals of all ages are welcome to bring their own music and/or instruments, and are encouraged to guide and/or mentor fellow group members.


Gibran Carter, MHSA Program Coordinator
(909) 326-4639

gcarter@tricitymhs.org

 

The Workforce Education and Training (WET) program was created through funding from the Mental Health Services Act (MHSA). The WET program is focused on improving the effectiveness of people currently providing support and services in the Tri-City area as well as, preparing the community for careers in mental health.Clinical and non-clinical staff, family, community caregivers and volunteers are the primary recipients of the education and training offered through the WET Plan. Listed below are the main components of the WET Plan:

  • Developing the volunteer workforce
  • Connecting with college students that are interestedin volunteering/careers in mental health
  • Engaging volunteers and future employees
  • Connecting with high school students that are interestedin volunteering/careers in mental health
  • Staff training and support
  • Staff development

The WET staff is implementing these actions and more to bring awareness to the Mental Health System as well as provide staff, volunteers, and community caregivers the resources and tools to do their jobs more effectively.

If you are interested in volunteering at Tri-City, please click here.

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